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Monoamine transmission: from mechanisms to movement

Dopamine neurons and extended dendrites in substantia nigra
Dopamine neurons and extended dendrites in substantia nigra

The neurotransmitter dopamine in the brain is critical to how we choose our everyday actions, by signaling our motivations and selecting appropriate movements. When dopamine function is disrupted, a range of psychomotor disorders can result that include addiction disorders and Parkinson’s disease.

Our work explores how dopamine function is governed and dysregulated through study of dopamine transmission in real-time.

In a range of parallel and intersecting projects, we are exploring:

  • Mechanisms on dopamine axons that govern dopamine output
  • Circuits that govern dopamine transmission
  • Dopamine signalling dysfunctions in Parkinson’s disease
  • How drugs of addiction modify dopamine signals
  • How dopamine controls behaviour

Please get in touch if you’d like to find out how to join the lab.

 

Our team

Cragg Group News

Caution when looking at cell recycling in parkinsons

Caution when looking at cell recycling in Parkinson’s

Our Researchers at the Oxford Parkinson’s Disease Centre have shown that cell recycling in Parkinson’s may play a more complex role than previously thought.

New light shed on what controls our motivated actions

New light shed on what controls our motivated actions

The release of dopamine in the brain plays a key role in determining how we respond when we perceive a potential reward or benefit. But so far little has been understood about the mechanism behind this. A new collaborative paper from Prof Stephanie Cragg's Group and Prof Ed Mann published in Nature Communications has uncovered a dominant regulator of the dynamics of dopamine output.

Postdoctoral researchers and students shine at neuroscience theme day

Postdoctoral researchers and students shine at Neuroscience Theme Day

The talks given by Postdoctoral Research Scientists and Graduate Students highlighted the full range of research in DPAG, spanning molecular and cellular neuroscience all the way to systems neuroscience.

Viral tweet helps find oxford medical student and former dpag member samaritan

Viral tweet helps find Oxford medical student and former DPAG member Samaritan

An Oxford University medical student who stepped in to help a stranger off a train has been identified following a viral appeal to find and thank her. Rebecca te Water Naude was once a member of Stephanie Cragg's Group here in DPAG.

Professor annette dolphin frs gives the 2019 mabel fitzgerald lecture

Professor Annette Dolphin FRS gives the 2019 Mabel FitzGerald lecture

The annual lecture is held in honour of the pioneering physiologist and clinical pathologist, Mabel Purefoy Fitzgerald.

Sherrington Talks 2016 : Prize Winners

On 24 June 12 students presented talks about their works to their peers and colleagues. At the close of the event, prizes were presented to the following students:

Dopamine Club

  • Welcome to the Dopamine Club!

    Dopamine Club is an informal, lab meeting-style forum that brings dopamine researchers together from across the University to exchange and discuss our different perspectives on dopamine.

  • About us

    Dopamine Club was founded in 2014 to bring together dopamine researchers within the University and promote interactions towards the common goal of understanding dopamine function.

  • Core contributors

    Anyone is welcome to attend, organise and participate in Dopamine Club meetings and we'd like it to be as interactive as possible so if you want to be involved please get in touch (stephanie.cragg@dpag.ox.ac.uk, or any of the other contributing groups).

  • Meeting format

    Meetings are held termly, usually on Monday of 8th week, in DPAG. Meetings are chaired by different labs on a rotating basis.

Related research themes