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We play a leading role in the development of more efficient and cost-effective sequencing technologies.

Male Drosophila accessory gland

Understanding genetics through computation and experimentation

Our functional genomics program combines theory and practice to capitalize on the wealth of information available from genomic sequencing. We’re driven by a desire to understand human disease through analysing patients and relevant animal models – which means our work can often be translated into clinical practice.

Much of our work is based on the core principle of using model organisms to better understand human disease. A major driving force behind our research, for instance, is the MRC Functional Genomics Unit (FGU). Using genomic information from patients, it combines rigorous computational analysis and interpretation to identify the genetic origins of common neurological diseases such as Parkinson’s and multiple sclerosis.

Elsewhere, our researchers work across a wide range of diseases, but are always led by clinical relevance. Studying the single gene defects responsible for Duchenne muscular dystrophy has led to effective treatments for the disease in mice which are now being translated for use in human, for instance, while computational analysis of enormous genomic data sets is shedding light on the origins of neurodevelopmental disorders like autism and ADHD. Even some of our most basic work, such as fruit fly genetics, is resulting in the discovery of new cellular organelles and uncovering the basis of sexual development.

In the future, the availability of genomic data looks set to increase exponentially, and our Computational Genomics Analysis and Training Programme (www.cgat.org) is equipping researchers from a diverse range of backgrounds to process and interpret their results more efficiently. While there’s no denying that genomic information has begun to transform the treatment of patients, we hope to ensure it will increasingly make good on its early promise and continues to flourish.



Groups within this theme

Understanding Cerebellar Development and Disease
Becker Group

Understanding Cerebellar Development and Disease

Molecular Analysis of Neuromuscular Diseases
Davies Group

Molecular Analysis of Neuromuscular Diseases

We investigate neuroimmune molecular mechanisms underlying obesity.
Domingos Group

We investigate neuroimmune molecular mechanisms ...

Genetic Dissection of Sexual Behaviour
Goodwin Group

Genetic Dissection of Sexual Behaviour

Sleep, brain and behaviour laboratory
Vyazovskiy Group

Sleep, brain and behaviour laboratory

Understanding molecular mechanisms of age-related neurodegenerative diseases to generate novel molecular therapies
Wade-Martins Group

Understanding molecular mechanisms of age-related ...

Cell Biology of Exosome Signalling, Secretion and Growth in Normal and Cancer Cells at Super-Resolution
Wilson Group

Cell Biology of Exosome Signalling, Secretion and ...

Latest news

Dr Oliver Stone starts research group as Sir Henry Dale Fellow

Dr Stone has been awarded a Wellcome Trust Henry Dale Fellowship to lead research investigating how lineage history can impact vascular cell fate and function.

COVID-19 drug trial could lead to enhanced respiratory care for patients

Researchers at the University of Oxford led by DPAG's Professor Peter Robbins are working with clinical collaborators from NHS hospitals to carry out a new clinical drug trial aimed at treating COVID-19, funded by LifeArc. It will test a drug that could raise oxygen levels in the blood in COVID-19 patients in order to improve their chances of recovery. Raising oxygen levels is important in COVID-19, because many patients with the disease die when oxygen levels in their arterial blood fall to levels that are too low to support life.

HCQ with antibiotics to treat COVID-19 could be dangerous for the heart

DPAG researchers have collaborated on an international study that demonstrates a detailed mechanistic understanding of how the anti-malaria drug, Hydroxychloroquine, combined with antibiotics, can cause adverse cardiac side-effects in COVID-19 patients. This gives weight to US Federal advice against using this combined treatment.