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Local school students engaged in exciting new careers mentoring programme

Athena SWAN Outreach Postdoctoral Riley Group News

DPAG Postdoctoral Research Scientist Dr Sophia Malandraki-Miller took part in a pilot careers mentoring session at Oxford High School. This exciting new engagement programme is a collaboration between Medical Sciences Division researchers and Oxford Biomedical Research Centre and aims to increase awareness of the variety of careers in biomedicine.

How DPAG is supporting our staff, students and community during the Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak

General Teaching

DPAG announces the closure of all buildings from Friday 27 March at noon and outlines how our department is operating during the pandemic.

Shared Parental Leave Spotlight for Mother's Day

Athena SWAN General

Oxford University's Shared Parental Leave (SPL) scheme enables parents to share a period of leave and pay following the birth or adoption of their child. Several departmental members who have used the scheme report valuable increased bonding with their children.

DPAG Students win 2020 Goodger and Schorstein Awards

Athena SWAN Students

Congratulations are in order to Britt Hanson and Dr Lukas Krone, who have won Goodger and Schorstein Awards from the Medical Sciences Internal Fund.

Support Oxford's Response to the COVID-19 Outbreak

General Research

Funding for Oxford’s COVID-19 research requires unprecedented speed, scope and ambition. Please make a gift.

Prof. Dr. Nils Brose honours former teacher Marianne Fillenz in Memorial Lecture

Head of Department's News

The annual lecture is held in honour of one of the great physiologists of the last century, Marianne Fillenz. Fillenz was a devoted and much loved University Demonstrator in the Laboratory of Physiology and her lab was positioned at the forefront of the application of measuring chemicals that could be detected directly at the electrode.

Oxford Medical Students and DPAG tutors are setting the standard for neuroanatomy teaching

Athena SWAN Students Teaching

Pre-clinical Medicine Undergraduate students Kacper Kurzyp, Rafee Ahmed and Oliver Bredemeyer achieved Oxford University's best ever performance in The National Undergraduate Neuroanatomy Competition at the University of Southampton. Their participation was sponsored by DPAG with Professor Zoltán Molnár and Departmental Lecturer Dr Michael Gilder providing extra tuition to prepare them for their successful performances.

Communicating the messages of extracellular vesicles to the wider public

Outreach Research Students

DPAG's Denis Noble has collaborated with Wood Group researchers in the Department of Paediatrics to produce innovative podcast talks on a prominent global platform, the Future Tech Podcast, following the successful DPAG hosted fourth annual Oxosome meeting. Following the release of the final podcast talk in February 2020, today we chart the story leading to these innovative pieces of public engagement.

Professor Eve Marder delivers the 2020 Mabel FitzGerald Prize Lecture

Athena SWAN Head of Department's News

The annual lecture is held in honour of the pioneering physiologist and clinical pathologist, Mabel Purefoy FitzGerald.

New human heart model set to boost future cardiac research and therapies

Cardiac Theme Postdoctoral Publication Research

DPAG's Dr Jakub Tomek and Professor Blanca Rodriguez's Computational Cardiovascular Science Team have developed a new computer model that recreates the electrical activity of the ventricles in a human heart. In doing so, they have uncovered and resolved theoretical inconsistencies that have been present in almost all models of the heart from the last 25 years and created a new human heart model that could enable more basic, translational and clinical research into a range of heart diseases and potentially accelerate the development of new therapies.

New target identified for repairing the heart after heart attack

Athena SWAN Cardiac Theme Publication Research Riley Group News

An immune cell is shown for the first time to be involved in creating the scar that repairs the heart after damage. The Riley Group study was funded by the British Heart Foundation and led by BHF CRE Intermediate Transition Research Fellow Dr Filipa Simões.

New insights into how the brain makes sense of our constantly changing soundscape

Publication Research

We experience a wide range of sounds at varying levels. The brain's auditory neurons constantly adapt their responses to changes in sound level to help us perceive and understand what we hear. King Group researchers have previously demonstrated how these neurons do this and have now produced new evidence for exactly where this happens in the brain and the perceptual consequences of these adaptations.

Malnutrition linked with increased risk of Zika birth defects

Publication Research

The severity of Zika virus-related deformations in babies has been shown to be affected by environmental factors such as maternal nutrition. The study was partially funded by a joint MRC Grant between DPAG's Professor Zoltán Molnár and Associate Professor Patricia Garcez of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro.

Understanding the mechanisms driving a major type of immune cell to keep our gut healthy

Athena SWAN Postdoctoral Publication Research

A news and views article published in Nature Immunology by Domingos Group researchers examines significant recent research revealing how group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s), the cells responsible for protecting the gut and maintaining intestinal homeostasis, are regulated. In doing so, they also reveal important new research avenues of ILCs activation in the body.

New target identified to help prevent dangerous heart rhythms after heart attack

Cardiac Theme Publication Research

For many years, we have been using beta-blockers to neutralise a specific stress hormone and prevent dangerous heart rhythms following a heart attack. However, a new study led by Associate Professor Neil Herring and published in the European Heart Journal has uncovered evidence for an additional stress hormone acting as a key trigger for dangerous heart rhythms that is not currently targeted by these drugs.

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