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The Department would like to congratulate Dr Megan Cameron Neville, Dr Johannes Dahmen, Dr Anna Hoerder-Suabedissen, Dr Dan Li, Dr Michael Puljung, Dr Fernando Rodriquez Nodal and Dr Ben Willmore, who have all been conferred the title of Departmental Lecturer.

 

I am delighted to announce the names of colleagues who have been awarded the title of Departmental Lecturer in recognition of their high achievement in both research and teaching for the Department. The award is also acknowledgement of their continued service to the Department over and above their contractual obligations to undertake research. Many congratulations. - Head of Department Professor David Paterson

Dr Megan Neville focuses her research on understanding the genetic basis of sex-specific behaviours in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Dr Neville is also affiliated with St Catherine’s College where she lectures in Molecular Genetics for the Medicine undergraduate course.

Dr Johannes Dahmen's research aims to reveal how different parts of the auditory system such as auditory cortex, midbrain and thalamus interact with each other and other sensory systems as well as motor systems to give rise to sound guided behaviour. Dr Dahmen gives lectures on auditory neuroscience and imaging methods to Experimental Psychology and Biomedical Sciences undergraduates as well as MSc in Neuroscience students. 

Dr Anna Hoerder-Suabedissen focuses her research on early brain development, with special attention to the transient subplate layer of the cortex and activity dependent processes modulating circuit formation. Dr Hoerder-Suabedissen's teaching is focused on DPAG's graduate students, both as a Supervisor and as a Senior Doctoral Training Advisor. She also occasionally gives lectures on neurodevelopment and assists with neuroanatomy practicals.

Dr Dan Li focuses her research on understanding how the autonomic nervous system influences cardiac function in health and disease, using cellular and molecular approaches to investigate the interactions between different signalling cascades in the autonomic neurons and cardiomyocytes. Dr Li gives the lecture on the first year Medicine e-ECG Practical class, third year Medicine FHS Research project and is a former Senior Doctoral Training Advisor for DPAG's graduate students.

Dr Michael Puljung studies ATP-sensitive potassium channels, specialised proteins that detect changes in cellular metabolism after a meal and trigger insulin secretion. Dr Puljung is working towards a greater understanding of how the moving parts of this protein machine work together to shape its physiological role and how defects in this process cause disease. Dr Puljung's teaching includes tutorials for medical/biomedical sciences students on heart disease and non-opioid pain treatments, "supervising an excellent DPhil student on his thesis project", organising and facilitating an Ion Channel Physiology and Biophysics journal club for graduate students from several departments, and engaging the public via a collaboration with the Motionhouse dance company on their show Charge.

Dr Fernando Nodal studies the encoding of sensory information by neural activity, which has been long described but there is still a wide gap in our understanding on how that activity is related to actual perceptions.This relationship is studied by recording the neural activity of cortical neurons while animals perform different perceptual tasks beyond the simple sensory detection. Dr Nodal teaches sensory neuroscience for graduates on the MSc in Neuroscience and also for Medical and Biomedical Sciences undergraduates.

Dr Ben Willmore is sensory neuroscientist interested in how the brain represents information from the eyes and ears. Dr Willmore supervises DPhil and MSc students, is a module coordinator and lecturer for the MSc in Neuroscience, lectures for the Biomedical Sciences undergraduate course, and has given tutorials for many different courses over the years.

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Top Row L-R: Michael Puljung, Johannes Dahmen, Ben Willmore

Bottom Row L-R: Dan Li, Megan Neville, Anna Hoerder-Suabedissen, Fernando Nodal

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