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Event video for the Croonian Lecture 2019, delivered by Professor Dame Kay Davies on Wednesday 10 April 2019 at The Royal Society.

Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy therapy is at an exciting stage and Professor Dame Kay Davies was pleased to present the current status of development of these therapies at The Croonian Lecture 2019.

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Winners of the DPAG Student Poster Day 2022 announced

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