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A new study from OPDC Career Development Fellow Natalie Connor-Robson investigates how mutations in the gene LRRK2, which are known to cause Parkinson’s, affect normal cell function.

Most cases of Parkinson's are idiopathic, which simply means that we don't know the causeWhile only a small portion of all cases are thought to be directly linked to a genetic cause, researchers believe that understanding the genetic factors may lead to a greater understanding of how Parkinson's develops and provide key information on potential approaches to treatment.

Mutations in the LRRK2 gene are considered to be the most common factor in the development of Parkinson's. Dr Natalie Connor-Robson from the Wade-Martins Group has found compelling new evidence for exactly how mutations in the LRRK2 gene disturbs normal cell function.

Read the full article on the OPDC website.

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