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OPDC Feb 2019 study story png

A new OPDC study, published in Human Molecular Genetics, suggests innovative new ways for researchers to investigate potential therapies for people with Parkinson’s Disease.

The team behind the research generated the neurons affected in Parkinson’s Disease from stem cells reprogrammed using skin samples donated by people with the disease.

 

Read the full article on the OPDC website.

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