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A new institute for nanoscience research is to open in Oxford thanks to a $10 million gift from The Kavli Foundation, the ground floor of which will be home to cutting-edge new research avenues across the six themes of DPAG.

Artist impression of the Institute - a very modern tree-lined building

The new Kavli Institute for NanoScience Discovery (Kavli INSD) at Oxford, which will be the 20th Kavli Institute globally, will uniquely combine structural biology with world-leading biochemistry, pathology, chemistry, physics, physiology and engineering.

Kavli INSD will be based in a new building at the centre of Oxford’s Science Area site in close proximity to DPAG's Sherrington Building to facilitate close collaboration. The 40 faculty and 400 students, postdocs and research staff it will be home to will include several DPAG research groups spanning across the Department's six key themes of research: Cardiac Sciences, Cell Physiology, Development & Cell Biology, Functional Genomics, Metabolism & Endocrinology and Neuroscience. It will also involve the relocation of the Oxford Parkinson's Disease Centre and house a new Krebs Chair in Physiological Metabolism.

Furthermore, Kavli INSD will be led by Professor Carol Robinson, a highly decorated chemist, who in 2018 delivered the DPAG Mabel FitzGerald Prize Lecture outlining her work using mass spectrometry to elucidate the 3D structures of protein.

DPAG Head of Department Professor David Paterson said: "The Kavli Institute for Nanoscience Discovery is where physical sciences meets the cell. This is a fantastic opportunity for our Department, in particular our cell physiologists and cell biologists in neuroscience and cardiovascular science. DPAG has a significant footprint on the ground floor entry to Kavli, directly opposite the front doors of Sherrington".

More information on the institute can be found on the University of Oxford website.

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