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lub-dub, lub-dub, lub-dub is the sound of your heart beating in your chest. This is how we know we are alive. But what happens if it stops? If you are lucky and rushed to hospital quickly enough, you may escape with minimal damage, but many patients are left with a scar that doesn’t heal. Is there any hope of fixing the damage?
In the latest episode of the Oxford Sparks Big Questions podcast, they visited Cardiovascular Biologist, Nicola Smart, from our Department to ask: How do you mend a broken heart?
You can listen to Nicola's podcast here.

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