Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you will not see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

A team of volunteers from four research groups, alongside Wellcome Trust funded Advanced Imaging Unit Micron, engaged more than 200 visitors at Weston Library on Friday 18 October 2019 as part of The Oxford Science and Ideas Festival.

Photo credit: John Cairns/University of Oxford

IF Oxford is an annual science and ideas festival taking place in locations across the city. It offers a variety of events, workshops and talks to explore the latest scientific research with audiences of all ages, and creates an opportunity for thousands of face-to-face interactions between Festival visitors, researchers and innovators.

In an event entitled "Mice, chicks, fish and me!" led by the Srinivas and Mommersteeg labs, alongside Wellcome Trust funded Advanced Imaging Unit Micron, researchers gave visitors to the Weston Library the opportunity to explore how babies develop in the womb by manipulating embryos in virtual reality and observing them under microscopes. Visitors could also see how the hearts of live zebrafish embyros grow and change shape as they develop.

The stall attracted more than 230 visitors, with many staying for more than 10 minutes or even half hour, trying out their modules and asking the volunteers many questions about their work.

 

We were told repeatedly by visitors that our research was fascinating, that they very much appreciated our work and learned new things from our exhibit. Our team found the conversations with visitors complex and interesting. Our team really enjoyed the day in the library
- Postdoctoral Research Scientist Dr Tomoko Watanabe (Srinivas Group)

IF Oxford HeadlinePhoto credit: John Cairns/University of Oxford

Screenshot 2019-10-23 at 12.39.52.pngPhoto credit: John Cairns/University of Oxford

Screenshot 2019-10-23 at 12.44.08.pngPhoto credit: John Cairns/University of Oxford

IMG_7410a.jpgPhoto credit: Dr Shifaan Thowfeequ 

Volunteers across four DPAG research groups took part and the department would like to thank everyone below for their hard work on the day:

Dr Shifaan Thowfeequ (Srinivas Group)

Dr Matthew Stower (Srinivas Group)

Adwoa Sarfo-Bonsu (Srinivas Group)

Harry Nuttall (Srinivas Group)

Aashika Sekar (Wilson Group)

Will Stockdale (Mommersteeg Group)

Dr Zhilian Hu (Mommersteeg Group)

Irina-Elena Lupu (Smart Group)

Dr Andia Redpath (Smart Group)

Nadia Halidi (Micron)

Mick Phillip (Micron)

Ian Dobbie (Micron)

Prof Mathilda Mommersteeg (Mommersteeg Group Leader)

Dr Tomoko Watanabe (Srinivas Group organiser of the event)

Prof Shankar Srinivas (Srinivas Group Leader and departmental Academic Lead for Public Engagement)

IMG_7450.JPG

IMG_7442.JPG

 

We would also like to extend a very big thank you to the department's Facilities and Stores team, David Greenwood, Sean Alderson and Saul Pledge, for providing the volunteers with essential support for preparation. 

Similar stories

Earliest origins of the forming heart identified

Cardiac Theme Postdoctoral Publication Research

The earliest known progenitor of the outermost layer of the heart has been characterised for the first time and linked to the development of other critical cell types in the developing heart in a new paper from the Srinivas group led by BHF Immediate Fellow Dr Richard Tyser.

Lukas Krone to represent Oxford at the Global Young Scientists Summit

Awards and Honours EDI News Head of Department's News Students Vyazovskiy Group News

Congratulations are in order for Dr Lukas Krone who is one of just five University of Oxford researchers selected to attend the Global Young Scientists Summit 2021.

Covid-19 lung damage identified in study

Postdoctoral Research

In a new study into the longer-term damage amongst patients recovering from COVID-19, DPAG Research Fellow Dr James Grist of the Tyler Lab has been running a novel scanning technique that shows a dramatic decrease in the ability of the lungs to diffuse gas in to the blood stream after COVID infection. This work may shed light on the problem of breathlessness after COVID infection and help guide us in understanding therapeutic selection and efficacy.

New MRI technique could detect early signs of heart failure in cancer patients following chemotherapy

Cardiac Theme Postdoctoral Publication Research

New research led by Oxford BHF CRE Intermediate Transition Fellow Dr Kerstin Timm shows that a recently developed imaging technique pioneered by the Tyler Group can detect early metabolic changes in the heart caused by a commonly used chemotherapy drug, which is known to increase risk of heart failure in cancer survivors.

MRC Senior Non-Clinical Fellowship awarded to Samira Lakhal-Littleton

Awards and Honours Cardiac Theme EDI News Lakhal-Littleton Group News

Congratulations are in order for Associate Professor Samira Lakhal-Littleton, who has been awarded a Senior Non-Clinical Fellowship by the Medical Research Council to further her lab's work exploring the implications of the cardiac hepcidin/ferroportin axis for the management of iron deficiency in heart failure.

Researchers reveal surprising simplicity behind our ability to hear

Postdoctoral Publication Research Students

A computational modelling study from the King Group demonstrates that the way sounds are transformed from the ear to the brain’s auditory cortex may be simpler than expected. These findings not only highlight the value of computational modelling for determining the principles underlying neural processing, but could also be useful for improving treatments for patients with hearing loss.