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A department-wide image competition has yielded a range of stunning images showcasing the diversity and breadth of DPAG's science. Three prize winners and eight commended pictures are announced.

In Michaelmas Term 2021, Head of Department Professor David Paterson ran an image competition to refresh the science displayed on the Sherrington building walls. All members of DPAG were invited to take part and a wide variety of research images across a range of styles and themes were carefully considered.

Professor David Paterson said: "We received the largest number of images to date for a DPAG Image Competition. All images were judged blindly. They were all of a very high quality, so it was a difficult decision."

Congratulations to DPhil student Florina Szabo of the Molnár Group on winning the first prize, to postdoctoral fellow Dr Richard Tyser of the Srinivas Group on winning second prize, and to DPhil student Judy Sayers of the Riley Group on winning third prize. Their pictures will be framed and displayed in the Department. 

Additionally, eight commended pictures, submitted by five DPAG members have been selected. These pictures will also be framed and displayed in the Department. Congratulations to DPhil students Konstantinos Klaourakis (Vieira Group) and Auguste Vadisiute (Molnár Group), and to postdoctoral research scientists Dr Robert Lees (Packer Group) and Dr Zeynep Okray (Waddell Group). Congratulations also to Florina Szabo, who in addition to her first prize winning entry, has four additional commended images.


First Prize - £100 Blackwell's vouchers - 
Florina Szabo 

FlorinaSzaboBW.jpg

Epifluorescent image showing PV+ interneurons (green) in the mouse motor and somatosensory cortex and glutamatergic layer 5 cortical pyamidal neurons (red)

1st place - Florina Szabo - Merged Cortex

Second Prize - £75 Blackwell’s vouchers - Dr Richard Tyser 

RichardTysercropped.jpgImage of a mouse embryo around halfway through gestation (Embryonic Day 10). In white is the forming vasculature and in red is muscle highlighting the forming heart in the centre.

2nd place - Richard Tyser - mouse embryo heart© Richard Tyser

Third Prize - £50 Blackwell’s vouchers - Judy Sayers 

Judy SayersThe Cardiac Conduction System and coronary arteries

3rd place - Judith Sayers - cardiac system© Judith Sayers

Commended - Konstantinos Klaourakis 

KostasKlaourakiscropped.jpgMACROPHAGES AND BLOOD VASCULATURE FROM WHOLE MOUSE EMBRYO

Commended - Kostas Klaourakis - embryo© Konstantinos Klaourakis

Commended - Dr Robert Lees

Robert LeesSOMATOTOPIC WHISKER RESPONSES: CALCIUM FLUORESCENCE RESPONSES TO MULTIPLE INDIVIDUAL WHISKER STIMULATIONS (COLOURED), AS SEEN THROUGH A CRANIAL WINDOW IN MURINE SOMATOSENSORY CORTEX (GRAYSCALE; TWO-PHOTON IMAGE). THIS CLEARLY SHOWS THE SOMATOTOPY OF ADJACENT WHISKERS (GREEN/RED/BLUE AREAS) AND HOW THE PRIMARY (LEFT) AND SECONDARY (RIGHT) RESPONSES DIFFER IN TOPOLOGY. BRUKER ULTIMA 2PPLUS MICROSCOPE USED FOR TWO-PHOTON EXCITATION AND WIDEFIELD ILLUMINATION.

Commended - Robert Lees© Robert Lees

Commended - Dr Zeynep Okray

ZeynepOkray.jpgCOLLAGE: A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A LAB FLY

Commended - Zeynep Okray© Zeynep Okray

Commended - Auguste Vadisiute 

Auguste VadisiuteUnder the spotlight

Commended - Auguste Vadisiute - Co4_TBC© Auguste Vadisiute

Commended - FLORINA SZABO 

FlorinaSzaboBW.jpgConfocal image of the hindbrain pontine gray showing axonal fibres of 'silenced' layer 5 glutamatergic pyramidal neurons (red), parvalbumin interneurons (cyan) and the perineural nets surrounding interneurons (magenta)

Commended - Florina Szabo - PG_SNAP.png© Florina Szabo

Confocal image depicting parvalbumin-positive interneurons (cyan) in the hippocampus and 'silenced' granule cells of the dentate gyrus

Commended - Florina Szabo - dentate_gyrus© Florina Szabo

 Pencil sketch of the heart combining art and anatomy

Commended - Florina Szabo - sketch_heart© Florina Szabo

Merged confocal image of mouse primary somatosensory cortex showing 'silenced' layer 5 glutamatergic pyramidal neurons (red), parvalbumin GABAergic interneurons (cyan), and the perineural net surrounding Parvalbumin interneurons (magenta)

Commended - Florina Szabo - merged_M1_SNAP© Florina Szabo

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