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The University of Oxford is delighted to announce that the first collaborative research projects to be agreed by the University under the Pfizer Rare Disease Consortium have been signed.

The collaborations are the result of a strategic alliance to develop new treatments for rare diseases which was put in place by the University of Oxford, Imperial College London, University College London, King’s College London, Queen Mary University London, and Cambridge University acting through GMEC Pfizer will be collaborating with the University of Oxford in haematology and neuromuscular disorders. Michael Skynner, Head of Rare Disease Alliances, Pfizer, says “I am delighted to see concrete output from the first Pfizer Rare Disease Consortium call for proposals with GMEC, in the form of three funded research proposals at the University of Oxford. I look forward to a close scientific interaction between Oxford and Pfizer over the next three years”.

Congratulations to the successful Principal Investigators:

  • Professor Dame Kay Davies and Professor Matthew Wood from the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics.
  • Professor Alexander Drakesmith and Professor Simon Draper from the Weatherall Institute for Molecular Medicine and the Jenner Institute respectively.
  • Dr Wyatt Yue from the Structural Genomics Consortium.

We wish them good luck for their research!

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