Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you will not see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

The Jacob Henle Medal recognises outstanding, medically relevant scientific achievements in physiology and medicine. It is awarded by Gottingen University, one of Germany's oldest institutions of higher learning.

Prof Dame Ashcroft is presented the Jacob Henle Medal and Scroll by Prof. Dr. med. Blanche Schwappach

Professor Dame Frances Ashcroft  FRS has received the highest annual award from the Medical Faculty of Georg-August University in Göttingen for her life's work in the field of physiology. 

The medal ceremony took place on Monday July 15 2019. A welcome and laudatory speech was given by Prof. Dr. med. Blanche Schwappach, Research Dean of the Medical Faculty and Director of the UMG Institute of Molecular Biology. 

The Jacob-Henle Medal, introduced in 1988, recognises high-impact scientific achievements in physiology and medicine. The award honours Friedrich Gustav Jacob Henle (1809 - 1885), an anatomist and physiologist who taught at the University of Göttingen for 33 years. Henle published the first descriptions of the structure and distribution of human epithelial tissue and of the fine structures of the eye and brain including Henle's loop of the kidney. His work is considered by many to have laid the foundation for modern pathology. 

Prof Dame Ashcroft is a Research Professor in the Department and a Fellow of Trinity College. She is known for her world-leading research on the ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel and its role in insulin secretion, both in health and diabetes. Her studies with Professor Hattersley (Exeter University) have shown activating mutations in this channel cause neonatal diabetes and transformed therapy for these patients. Her recent studies focus on how metabolism regulates the channel and how impaired metabolic regulation may underlie the progressive decline in beta-cell function in diabetes.

She is also the author of a several scientific and popular science books, including the bestseller “Life at the Extremes, The Science of Survival” and the Spark of Life: electricity in the human body.  In addition to her scientific achievements, the award recognises her extensive public engagement work as an ambassador of science and her commitment to mentoring young and emerging scientists.

At the medal ceremony, Prof Dame Ashcroft gave the Jacob Henle Lecture on "Sweetness and Light - Metabolic regulation of insulin secretion in health and diabetes".

Similar stories

Richard Tyser and Jack Miller honoured by the British Society of Cardiovascular Research

Dr Richard Tyser is this year’s winner of the Bernard and Joan Marshall Early Career Investigator Prize, and Dr Jack Miller has received a runner-up award, at the British Society of Cardiovascular Research Autumn Meeting.

Xin Sun shortlisted in national science image competition

DPAG Postdoctoral Research Scientist Dr Xin Sun has been shortlisted in the British Heart Foundation’s (BHF) annual ‘Reflections of Research’ image competition.

Gosia Cyranka and Sian Wilcox honoured by The Physiological Society

DPAG DPhil students Gosia Cyranka and Sian Wilcox have been awarded prestigious Early Career Researcher Prizes at Physiology 2021, The Physiological Society's Annual Conference celebrating first-class physiology.

Small Lecture Theatre renamed to honour DPAG pioneer Florence Buchanan

The newly renamed Florence Buchanan Lecture Theatre is testament to Dr Buchanan’s pioneering career in physiology, in line with the Department's ongoing commitment to acknowledge the significant contribution of women to DPAG and its predecessor departments.

Oxford Medical Students shine in National Undergraduate Neuroanatomy Competition 2021

Preclinical Medicine Undergraduate students Thomas Henning, Ivan Jim Paul and Owen Sweeney have helped Oxford build on last year to achieve the University's best ever performance in The National Undergraduate Neuroanatomy Competition. Preparation for their successful participation was assisted by DPAG's Professor Zoltán Molnár, Dr Michael Gilder and Samuel Snowdon.