Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

The research, funded by Parkinson's UK, reveals that an experimental drug, tasquinimod, originally developed for prostate cancer, may have the potential to treat Parkinson's disease.

Image taken by the team of Parkinson’s stem cell-derived neurons growing

The Oxford Parkinson's Disease Centre team, in a study led by Professor Richard Wade-Martins and Professor Caleb Webber, have found compelling evidence that an experimental cancer drug may have the potential to treat Parkinson's disease.

Their research, funded by Parkinson's UK, suggests that tasquinimod, a drug not yet on the market, works by interacting with a key protein inside brain cells called HDAC4. This interaction controls the activity of genes that may be critical in the development of Parkinson's. 

The team are using pioneering stem cell techniques to grow brain cells from skin cell samples, donated by both people with and without the condition.

 

More information is available on the Parkinson's UK website and the Parkinson's UK Research Blog

More detail is also available on The University of Oxford website.

Read the full Cell Stem Cell paper here.

Similar stories

Can humans hibernate?

Illuminating new TEDx Talk from Professor of Sleep Physiology Vladyslav Vyazovskiy

New insights into chemogenetic designer drugs to enhance our study of behaviour

A collaborative team of researchers in DPAG and Pharmacology led by Dr Lukas Krone have uncovered striking new data demonstrating that two widely used designer drugs used to turn populations of neurons on and off in the brain cause unexpected effects on sleep. These results demonstrate a critical need to improve chemogenetic approaches in behavioural studies.

Unlocking the Secrets of cAMP Signalling in the Heart: A Pathway to Targeted Therapeutics

A new Zaccolo group study has revealed key new insights into the role of cAMP signalling in both healthy and disease settings within the heart. They have identified new cAMP nanodomains in cardiac muscle cells that have far reaching implications for the treatment of heart disease.

Key exosome subtype in cancer progression identified

Collaborative work from DPAG and Oncology researchers has revealed a potential new pathway to block the production of a specific group of exosomes made in the cell’s recycling system that can promote the growth of cancerous tumours.

Inaugural Fellowship to Charmaine Lang paves the way to improved human models for Parkinson's drug discovery

Congratulations are in order for Departmental Research Lecturer Dr Charmaine Lang who has been awarded the first jointly funded Senior Research Fellowship from Parkinson’s UK and Rosetrees Trust. With this award, Dr Lang will develop complex new induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) models that target the interaction between dopamine neurons and astrocytes in the brain and how these fail in the context of Parkinson's.