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On 16th October, The Annual Burdon Sanderson Cardiac Science Centre lecture was given by Professor Viviana Gradinaru, from CALTECH, California, USA. Her talk was entitled "Optogenetic, tissue clearing, and viral vector approaches to understand and influence whole-animal physiology and behaviour". The lecture was followed by a drinks reception and dinner in the newly refurbished Sherrington Library for members of the Burdon Sanderson Cardiac Science Centre, who were glad of the opportunity to meet Prof Gradinaru and discuss each others’ research in a relaxed and enjoyable setting.  

Professor Viviana Gradinaru

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