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ACT4 features the University of Oxford and the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics.

Peter RobbinsAlastair BuchanThe leading cultural journal in Japan, ACT4, features the University of Oxford, in which the Head of Division, Prof. Alastair Buchan, and DPAG Head of Department, Prof. Peter Robbins, are highlighted for their key efforts to keep Oxford as the number one for medicine in world rankings for the last 4 years.

Among many researchers, Prof. Denis Noble, Kazuyo Maria Tasaki and Toshiaki William Tasaki introduced the way forward using Systems biology in bridging multi-disciplinary research.

 

Noble Group

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