Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you will not see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Scientist Mike Dodd began a career to fight a life-threatening heart condition after being told he might develop the illness himself.

As a teenager doctors told him he carried the gene which causes hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and that sparked an interest in the heart and how it works.

 The 28-year-old said: “It was scary. This is a condition that can cause sudden cardiac deaths. “You can be playing sport or doing something and you get a speeding up on your heart and you can literally drop dead.” The condition means sufferers have an irregular thickness of the heart. Former Oxford United player Mitchell Cole retired from the sport in 2011 after being diagnosed, but died of a heart attack aged 27 in 2012. Dr Dodd, who used to live in Cholsey, said he and his brother Chris were told they had inherited the gene when dad Ian was diagnosed with the condition. He added: “I was 14 when my dad went to the doctors and he realised he had something wrong.

 

He now researches the condition and heart disease in general for the university and is based at Headington’s John Radcliffe Hospital and the physiology department. Dr Dodd, who now lives in Burdell Avenue, Sandhills, with his wife, undergoes ultrasound tests on his heart every year. So far there are no signs that he will develop the condition. He said: “At the moment my heart appears normal, so I may develop symptoms later in life and I may not. It is a scary thing but I felt reassured by the constant monitoring.” But Dr Dodd said he has to be careful and that any strenuous exercise could be the “tipping point”.

Source: Oxford Mail