Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Gero Miesenböck has won the Massry Prize 2016 for his work on optogenetics. He shares the award with Karl Deisseroth of Stanford University and Peter Hegemann of the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin.

Gero Miesenböck has won the Massry Prize 2016 for his work on optogeneticsOptogenetics uses light-operated switches to control the electrical impulses of nerve cells. The ability to remote-control neuronal function has had a profound impact on neuroscience—it provides a direct means of probing the organisation of neural circuits and of identifying the brain processes underlying perception, action, emotion, and thought.

Established by the Meira and Shaul G. Massry Foundation, the Massry Prize has been awarded since 1996 to recognize outstanding contributions to the biomedical sciences and the advancement of health. Of the previous 40 winners of the prize, 21 have also received a Lasker Award and 12 a Nobel Prize.

This year’s Massry Prize will be presented on 22 October at Beverly Hills City Hall. The three laureates will speak about their award-winning research in companion events at the University of Southern California and the University of California, Los Angeles.

Similar stories

New computational technique reveals changes to lung function post COVID-19 infection

A collaborative DPAG-led study studied patients at six and twelve months after COVID-19 infection, finding that prior COVID-19 infection was associated with more uneven inflation of the lungs during normal breathing. There was also an association between hospitalisation with COVID-19 and smaller lung volumes, and admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) was associated with an enlarged respiratory dead space.

BHF funded DPAG projects to receive share of £2 million raised by the London Marathon

The British Heart Foundation were charity of the year for the 2022 TCS London Marathon. Around 800 BHF London Marathon runners, including former De Val lab researcher Dr Alice Preston, have raised nearly £2 million, and rising, for BHF-funded science that could lead to improved new treatments for heart failure. Research led by Associate Professor Sarah De Val and Dr Joaquim Vieira are two of eight projects to receive funding from these proceeds.

Zoltán Molnár honoured by the Royal Society of Biology

Congratulations are in order to Professor Zoltán Molnár on being elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Biology.

Vladyslav Vyazovskiy elected Vice President of the European Sleep Research Society

Congratulations are in order to Professor Vladyslav Vyazovskiy on his appointment as Vice President (Basic) of the European Sleep Research Society (ESRS).

New evidence for how our brains handle surprise

A new study from the Bruno Group is challenging our perceptions of how the different regions of the cerebral cortex function. A group of ‘quiet’ cells in the somatosensory cortex that rarely respond to touch have been found to react mainly to surprising circumstances. The results suggest their function is not necessarily driven by touch, but may indicate an important and previously unidentified role across all the major cortices.