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Dr Nora Bengoa-Verginory and Bryan Ng from the Wade-Martins Group were invited to deliver talks showcasing their research at the annual event from the Alzheimer’s Research UK Oxford network.

Photo credit: Stewart Humble

On Wednesday 31 July 2019 the Alzheimer’s Research UK Oxford network held it’s annual dementia research day, this year at Reading university. The network aims to bring together dementia researchers across disciplines at Oxford Brookes university, the University of Reading and the University of Oxford. There was a full day of talks and posters from labs across the region followed by a drinks reception and early careers social. The event was run by network coordinator Mark Dallas at Reading and network administrator Melanie Witt in DPAG.

Postdoctoral Research Scientist Dr Nora Bengoa-Vergniory was invited to give a talk about her work on the impact of molecular tweezers on Parkinson’s models. Nora has also recently been selected as an early career representative for the network. After the talks, she led an inspiring session for early career researchers to meet people from a range of different careers and chat about their journeys.

Graduate student Bryan Ng’s poster was selected for an elevated abstract talk and he shared an engaging short talk during the day on his work investigating AB-tau interaction in neurons.

Nora and Bryan ARUK.png

The network is open to all researchers with an interest in dementia. More information, including how to join, can be found on the ARUK website.

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