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herringandpatersontextbook.jpgNeil Herring, Associate Professor of Cardiovascular Physiology and Consultant Cardiologist, and David Paterson, Professor of Cardiovascular Physiology and Head of Department have joined forces to publish the sixth edition of "Levick’s Introduction to Cardiovascular Physiology" via CRC Press.

The first edition of ‘An Introduction to Cardiovascular Physiology” by Rodney Levick was published in 1990 and has been an invaluable textbook for generations of medical and biomedical science students.

Neil and David were honoured to be asked to take this textbook forward into its sixth edition. The content has been widely updated, and references revised to include reviews from leading experts, and classical original research papers.  By popular demand, the figures and illustration are now in full colour throughout the book.

The biggest change is the addition of two substantial new chapters aimed at bridging the gulf between reading a traditional textbook and reading original research papers as is required when undertaking a bachelor’s degree in medical science, research dissertation or a higher research degree.

Neil and David hope this will widen the book’s audience and build on the outstanding foundations it has provided in teaching cardiovascular physiology over the last 28 years.

"This edition is more than just an introductory textbook", writes Irv Zucker and Shivkumar in the book's forward. "It is, in our opinion, one of the most well written and well organised cardiovascular textbooks every published. It is comprehensive in its scope and at the same time elegant in its simplicity". 

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