Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

herringandpatersontextbook.jpgNeil Herring, Associate Professor of Cardiovascular Physiology and Consultant Cardiologist, and David Paterson, Professor of Cardiovascular Physiology and Head of Department have joined forces to publish the sixth edition of "Levick’s Introduction to Cardiovascular Physiology" via CRC Press.

The first edition of ‘An Introduction to Cardiovascular Physiology” by Rodney Levick was published in 1990 and has been an invaluable textbook for generations of medical and biomedical science students.

Neil and David were honoured to be asked to take this textbook forward into its sixth edition. The content has been widely updated, and references revised to include reviews from leading experts, and classical original research papers.  By popular demand, the figures and illustration are now in full colour throughout the book.

The biggest change is the addition of two substantial new chapters aimed at bridging the gulf between reading a traditional textbook and reading original research papers as is required when undertaking a bachelor’s degree in medical science, research dissertation or a higher research degree.

Neil and David hope this will widen the book’s audience and build on the outstanding foundations it has provided in teaching cardiovascular physiology over the last 28 years.

"This edition is more than just an introductory textbook", writes Irv Zucker and Shivkumar in the book's forward. "It is, in our opinion, one of the most well written and well organised cardiovascular textbooks every published. It is comprehensive in its scope and at the same time elegant in its simplicity". 

Similar stories

Key cause of type 2 diabetes uncovered

Research led by Dr Elizabeth Haythorne and Professor Frances Ashcroft reveals high blood glucose reprograms the metabolism of pancreatic beta-cells in diabetes. They have discovered that glucose metabolites, rather than glucose itself, are key to the progression of type 2 diabetes. Glucose metabolites damage pancreatic beta-cell function, so they are unable to release enough of the hormone insulin. Reducing the rate at which glucose is metabolised, and these glucose metabolites build up, can prevent the effects of hyperglycaemia.

New study shows clinical symptoms for Alzheimer’s can be predicted in preclinical models

Establishing preclinical models of Alzheimer’s that reflect in-life clinical symptoms of each individual is a critically important goal, yet so far it has not been fully realised. A new collaborative study from the University of Oxford has demonstrated that clinical vulnerability to an abnormally abundant protein in Alzheimer’s brain is in fact reflected in individual patient induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cortical neurons.

Updating the circuit maps of the sympathetic neural network

A new review from Professor Ana Domingos’ lab and colleagues offers a fresh modern viewpoint on sympathetic neurons and their relation to immune cells and obesity.

New computational technique reveals changes to lung function post COVID-19 infection

A collaborative DPAG-led study studied patients at six and twelve months after COVID-19 infection, finding that prior COVID-19 infection was associated with more uneven inflation of the lungs during normal breathing. There was also an association between hospitalisation with COVID-19 and smaller lung volumes, and admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) was associated with an enlarged respiratory dead space.

New evidence for how our brains handle surprise

A new study from the Bruno Group is challenging our perceptions of how the different regions of the cerebral cortex function. A group of ‘quiet’ cells in the somatosensory cortex that rarely respond to touch have been found to react mainly to surprising circumstances. The results suggest their function is not necessarily driven by touch, but may indicate an important and previously unidentified role across all the major cortices.