Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Dr. Bin Sun, a Dphil graduate from the Szele Research group within the Department, has published a paper in Cerebral Cortex based on his work. 

Bin's research showed that an epigenetic modification - diminishing the multi-protein complex "polycomb repressor complex 2" (PRC2) - severely reduces SVZ neurogenesis. He showed that selectively removing extra embryonic development (Eed) affects the maintenance of stem cells in the SVZ. This was a different effect from when he removed the enhancer of zeste 2 (Ezh2) methyltransferase component of PRC2, which Bin showed works downstream in the SVZ lineage.

Based on the embryonic stem cell literature, Bin went on to hypothesize that Eed may normally suppress expression of the transcription factor Gata6 and showed that this indeed was the case. He demonstrated that Gata6 overexpression phenocopied loss of Eed and that knocking Gata6 down was sufficient to rescue Eed function. Gata6 can affect expression of a key cell cycle regulator called P21 (a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor). Bin elegantly showed that in the SVZ, Gata6 regulates not transcription of P21 but its post-translational stability.

Finally he showed that Eed is necessary for activating SVZ repair mechanisms in traumatic brain injury.

Thus, Bin has made several important novel discoveries that have bearing on our understanding of how adult neurogenesis is regulated.

Congratulations Dr Sun!

 

To find out more information about what the Szele Research group gets up to, visit their website page.

Similar stories

New blood test from DPAG cardiac researchers could save lives of heart attack victims

Researchers from the Herring group have developed a blood test that measures stress hormone levels after heart attacks. The test – costing just £10 – could ensure patients receive timely life-saving treatment.

Mootaz Salman set to target new treatments for stroke

The Chief Scientist Office of the Government of Scotland has awarded a collaborative grant of £298,966 to Dr Mootaz Salman to seek new therapeutic avenues to treat stroke.

Inaugural winners of the DPAG Prize for Public Engagement with Research announced

Congratulations are in order for the winners Katherine Brimblecombe and Anna Kordala, and also to Jéssica Luiz and Andia Redpath who were highly commended for their outreach and public engagement work.

New BBSRC grant to further our insights into how the cortex controls sleep

Professor of Sleep Physiology Vladyslav Vyazovskiy and Professor of Developmental Neuroscience Zoltán Molnár have been awarded a Project Grant from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) for “Brain mechanisms of sleep: top-down or bottom-up?”

Raised intracellular chloride levels underlie the effects of tiredness in cortex

A new study, co-authored by Professor Vladyslav Vyazovskiy, published in Nature Neuroscience, has revealed that intracellular chloride levels within cortical pyramidal neurons reflect sleep–wake history.