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The revised and updated "Human Metabolism: A Regulatory Perspective" offers a new and integrated review of metabolism and metabolic regulation, where difficult concepts are explained in clear and concise terms to provide an accessible and essential guide to the topic.

Rhys Evans, Reader in Metabolic Biochemistry here at DPAG, has joined forces with Keith Frayn, Oxford University Emeritus Professor of Human Metabolism, to publish the fourth edition of "Human Metabolism: A Regulatory Perspective" with Wiley-Blackwell. 

The new edition offers a current and integrated review of metabolism and metabolic regulation. The authors explain difficult concepts in clear and concise terms in order to provide an accessible and essential guide to the topic. The text covers a comprehensive and diverse range of topics, including energy balance, body weight regulation, exercise, and how the body copes with extreme situations. The book also illustrates how metabolic regulation allows the human body to adapt to many different conditions.

Metabolism is a subject which students have traditionally approached with trepidation and apprehension, conjuring up ideas of rote-learning of long biochemical pathways whose components have confusing names and whose function is uncertain. The result is a fear of a fascinating topic, one that is core to many undergraduate courses, since the subject is so fundamental to understanding biological function, as well as being central to the aetiology of many important diseases. - Prof Rhys Evans

Professor Keith Frayn’s original book, "Metabolic Regulation: A Human Perspective", which proved highly popular with readers, aimed to dispel the myths of the subject being difficult, and according to Prof Evans, went some way to making metabolism accessible to a wide variety of bioscience students. After three editions of this text, a new version has now been produced, in which a subtle change of emphasis is indicated by the revised title.

The new book is essentially a rewrite in which metabolic regulation is still given due prominence, but additionally all aspects of human metabolism are thoroughly outlined and described. The emphasis is on human metabolism throughout the text.

The book now constitutes an ideal "primer" in the subject, and whilst the metabolic pathways are not described in intermediate-by-intermediate detail, the reader can easily gain a sense of metabolic pathway function and relevance.  - Prof Rhys Evans

Also new to this edition are more clinical aspects of metabolism and metabolic disease. Consequently, the book has been written for students of biochemistry, physiology, biomedical science, medicine and sports science, and also offers inherent value to Nutrition Scientists and Dietitians.

This fourth edition also includes numerous helpful illustrations that illuminate the regulatory mechanisms by which all cells control the metabolic processes necessary for life.

More information on the text is available here.

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