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As part of its commitment to developing better medicines for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), WAVE has extended its ongoing research collaboration with the University of Oxford to advance stereopure nucleic acid therapies for DMD across exons.

microRNA array identifying extracellular microRNAs elevated in mdx mouse serum and normalised following peptide-conjugated oligonucleotide therapy

 microRNA array identifying extracellular microRNAs elevated in mdx mouse serum and normalised following peptide-conjugated oligonucleotide therapy

Through the collaboration, renowned researcher Matthew Wood and his team will continue to work with WAVE to use the company’s proprietary platform to enhance oligonucleotide approaches, including exon-skipping, to address the rare genetic muscle disease.
 
“The data we have seen to date using WAVE’s novel approach to exon-skipping in DMD is very promising. I believe that academia and industry, working together, may be on the verge of a veritable medical revolution where we can potentially effectively and durably treat genetically based diseases such as DMD,” said Professor Wood.

“Collaborations between academia and industry are critical now more than ever in order to collectively harness the latest scientific advancements to rapidly progress therapies for patients. We look forward to expanding our collaboration with the WAVE team and advancing the potential and benefits of stereopure oligonucleotide approaches for DMD.”

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