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As part of Brain Awareness Week 2014, the auditory neuroscience group in DPAG is putting on a series of interactive activities that include visualizing your own speech sounds and demonstrating how are ears and brains process these sounds.

Come along and visualize your own speech sounds, and learn how our ears and brains process these sounds. See how functional imaging provides a window into the working of the brain. Learn how diet can have an important effect on your brain. Have a go at using your brainwaves to move an object. Test your reaction times and see how this changes throughout our lives. Explore visual illusions and how attention can influence what we see. Try building a brain from plasticine and investigate the function of the different brain regions.

Museum of the History of Science, Broad Street, Oxford OX1 3AZ. Basement Gallery, Daily From Tuesday 11th March 12:00 - 17:00 (not Saturday) Sunday 14:00 - 17:00

Suitable for ages 6 and up.

More info here.

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