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Associate Professor Sarah De Val is part of a research network that has recently secured funding from The Foundation Leducq Transatlantic Networks of Excellence Programme. 

The programme provides $6,000,000 over five years to teams of researchers working collaboratively in the areas of cardiovascular and neurovascular disease.

The network that Sarah is collaborating with, is researching transcription factor Klf2 and cardiovascular disease and is made up of six PIs from around the world, including a European Coordinator and a North American Coordinator. 

Transcription factors are a wide number of proteins that initiate and regulate the process of converting, or transcribing, DNA (the essential material of genes) into RNA (the copy of DNA used to direct the making-or coding- of all other proteins).

This network will thoroughly study one transcription factor called Kruppel-like factor (Klf) 2. The group notes that Klf2 has a central role in many cardiovascular processes, and works in the lining of arteries, in the lymph system and in the brain’s blood vessels.

The network brings together a group of investigators with expertise in vascular biomechanics, metabolism, gene transcription, mouse genetics and disease models to understand Klf2 regulation and function in these diverse biologic settings. They believe that a strong molecular focus on this single factor is required to make true breakthrough discoveries about human cardiovascular disease.

Congratulations to Sarah and her collaborators! 

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