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Betina Ip, a Royal Society Dorothy Hodgkin Research Fellow based in NDCN, formerly a postdoctoral research scientist in DPAG, has written a book for children: The Usborne Book of the Brain and How it Works.

Betina Ip's daughters pictured laughing and holding a copy of Book of the Brain in the park.

Betina’s research aims to understand how we learn to see in depth, by investigating the neural circuitry underlying depth perception in the human brain. Her research can help develop treatments for ‘amblyopia’, a neurodevelopmental condition that affects around 3% of the general population and is linked to a loss of normal binocular vision.

Usborne have just published her "Book of the Brain". 

Read her interview on the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences website.

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