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Today, the UK funding bodies have published the results of the UK’s most recent national research assessment exercise, the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2021. Research from the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics was submitted to Unit of Assessment 5 along with research from the departments of Biochemistry, Dunn School of Pathology,  Pharmacology, Plant Sciences and Zoology.

Head of Department Professor David Paterson said: "I am delighted to report Oxford’s success to UoA5 in the National Research Excellence framework (2021), which our Department contributed. We had the largest national submission, in which 95% of the total profile (outputs, impact, environment) was rated world-leading or internationally excellent (4*/3*).  Pleasingly our UoA achieved a 4* 100% rating for environment, outputs 91.8% 4*/3*, and impact 100% 4*/3*. This is a terrific achievement for all involved and speaks well of our colleagues as we improved on all metrics from REF2014. Based on volume of world-leading research (4* x FTE) we continue to maintain our leading position on research power. Many congratulations."

Read more about the University of Oxford REF results.

The highlights of the University's submission can be found on the Oxford REF 2021 webpages.

Read more from the Medical Sciences Division.

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