Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you will not see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Professor Frances Ashcroft has been selected as the recipient of the Jacobæus Prize 2014. The Prize is awarded annually by the Novo Nordisk Foundation to an internationally recognized researcher for extraordinary achievements within medical research.

Source: Novo Nordisk Fonden

 

Frances Ashcroft, Professor of Physiology at the University of Oxford, a Fellow of Trinity College, Oxford and a Fellow of the Royal Society of London, is awarded the Jacobæus Prize for her achievements within diabetes research.

Her research aims to elucidate how changes in blood glucose levels regulate insulin secretion from the pancreas and how this process is impaired in diabetes.

Frances Ashcroft has discovered that the ATP‐sensitive potassium (KATP) channel serves as the molecular link between glucose elevation and insulin secretion. Mutations in KATP channel genes cause a rare inherited form of diabetes (neonatal diabetes), and her work has helped enable patients with this disorder to switch from insulin injections to drug therapy.

As well, she has written two books for the general reader: Life at the Extremes and The Spark of Life.

Professor Ashcroft says:

- It is a very great honour to be awarded the 2014 Jacobæus Prize. It is one of the oldest and most prestigious prizes in science, and it recognizes not only my contribution, but also that of my team and collaborators. I look forward to visiting Copenhagen to present our latest work on the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of insulin secretion in health and in diabetes.

Lecture in Copenhagen

The Jacobæus Prize is unanimously awarded by the Nordic Research Committee, the committee of the Novo Nordisk Foundation which awards the Prize. Professor Ashcroft is the 69th recipient of the Prize, which was established in 1939 and is the oldest prize of the Foundation. The Prize includes an amount of DKK 100,000 and the prizewinner is invited to give a lecture on her research, the H.C. Jacobæus Lecture.

The lecture takes place at the annual H.C. Jacobæus Symposium, this year held at the University of Copenhagen on December 9. The event is open to the press.

The Prize honors Hans Christian Jacobæus (1879-1937), who was a respected and well-known Swedish professor and pioneering clinical researcher within the field of lung physiology and pathophysiology. His research includes the development of a method for exploring the pleural cavity (thoracoscopy) using a cystoscope, which greatly improved the diagnosis and treatment of lung diseases, especially tuberculosis.

Further information:

Christian Mostrup Scheel, Press Officer, Novo Nordisk Foundation, cims@novo.dk, mobile +45 3067 4805

 

Source: http://www.novonordiskfonden.dk/en/content/british-professor-wins-jacobaeus-prize-2014

Similar stories

Gero Miesenböck to deliver The Physiological Society's Annual Review Prize Lecture

Awards and Honours CNCB

The Annual Review Prize Lecture is The Physiological Society's most prestigious lecture.

New research grant to Pawel Swietach to further understanding of propionic acidemia

Awards and Honours Cardiac Theme

A new collaborative project led by the Swietach group funded by the Propionic Acidemia Foundation will investigate the disease mechanisms and risk factors for cardiac disease caused by a severe inherited disorder.

Two DPAG pioneers honoured on Sherrington Building Plaques

EDI News Head of Department's News

Honouring the heritage of pioneering physiologists Sir Charles Sherrington and Florence Buchanan. "Commemorating both pioneers together highlights the importance of advocacy and mentoring that was evident over a century ago as equality was championed." (David Paterson)

Celebrating International Women's Day

EDI News

100 years since women were admitted as full members of the University of Oxford, women now hold vital posts at all levels of this institution. Meet six amazing women from DPAG.