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Professor Denis Noble gave a Lecture at the University of Oxford's Biochemistry Society.

Dane to the tune of life

The lecture was based largely around Professor Noble's latest book, Dance to the Tune of LIfe, where he argues for a more nuanced view of evolutionary biology than that offered by neo-Darwinism. Professor Noble's book is available to purchase from CUP (UK) and Amazon UK.

Following his short talk, he took part in a question and answer session chaired by Dr Tianyi Zhang, President of the Biochemistry Society, which created much debate. The event was co-organised by T-Talks and the Biochemistry Society, and introduced by T-Talks President Dr Sung Hee Kim.

The talk was recorded and can be viewed here.

Praise for Dance to the Tune of Life:

'In my view Dance to The Tune of Life is a 'must read'. In it Denis Noble lucidly deconstructs how and why reductionism came to prominence in biology and led to the current state of molecular Humpty-Dumptyism. His central idea that there is no privileged level of causation is the first conceptual step to putting Humpty Dumpty back together again.'
Michael J. Joyner, Mayo Clinic, Minnesota

"This is an amazing book that soon should become a must read for every biologist!" Amazon.com

'Denis Noble is renowned for his mission to reintegrate the physiological sciences with mainstream biology, including evolutionary theory. His new book combines clear exposition of basic principles with many valuable examples. He gives the reader, general or expert, a completely new view of life.'
Yung E Earm, Seoul National University, South Korea

Read more reviews here.

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