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Thursday 15 & Friday 16 January 2015

The Department of Physiology, Anatomy & Genetics at the University of Oxford in conjunction with the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences is running a pioneering new course to practice a new technique of removing cancer in the bowel.

The procedure is being performed using the latest camera technology so that instead of having to open up the patient's abdomen (which is very invasive), the operation can be done minimally invasively. This is a brand new technique and Oxford is leading the way in teaching surgeons across Europe how to do the procedure.

Interested journalists are welcome to come down, film / photgraph and meet the course organisers - they could also try the cameras which viewers might find interesting.... this has the potential to revolutionise the way we treat colon cancer.

 

Visits will ONLY be possible on Friday morning.

Journalists who are interetsed and require more information, please contact Frances Valentine, course co-ordinator, on 07726 312 719.

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