Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Thursday 15 & Friday 16 January 2015

The Department of Physiology, Anatomy & Genetics at the University of Oxford in conjunction with the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences is running a pioneering new course to practice a new technique of removing cancer in the bowel.

The procedure is being performed using the latest camera technology so that instead of having to open up the patient's abdomen (which is very invasive), the operation can be done minimally invasively. This is a brand new technique and Oxford is leading the way in teaching surgeons across Europe how to do the procedure.

Interested journalists are welcome to come down, film / photgraph and meet the course organisers - they could also try the cameras which viewers might find interesting.... this has the potential to revolutionise the way we treat colon cancer.

 

Visits will ONLY be possible on Friday morning.

Journalists who are interetsed and require more information, please contact Frances Valentine, course co-ordinator, on 07726 312 719.

Similar stories

New evidence for how our brains handle surprise

A new study from the Bruno Group is challenging our perceptions of how the different regions of the cerebral cortex function. A group of ‘quiet’ cells in the somatosensory cortex that rarely respond to touch have been found to react mainly to surprising circumstances. The results suggest their function is not necessarily driven by touch, but may indicate an important and previously unidentified role across all the major cortices.

Professor Dame Sue Black to deliver 2022 Christmas Lectures

In the 2022 Christmas Lectures from the Royal Institution, DPAG's Visiting Professor of Forensic Anatomy Dame Sue Black will share secrets of forensic science.

Researchers describe how cancer cells can defend themselves from the consequences of certain genetic defects

Swietach Group scientists have identified a rescue mechanism that allows cancers to overcome the consequences of inactivating mutations in critically important genes.

DPAG hosts successful first Science in the Park event

More than 100 children, along with around 50 parents, grandparents and caregivers enjoyed an exciting variety of activities on the theme of ‘How the Body Works’ in University Parks on Tuesday 26 July. This ‘Science in the Park’ event was run by DPAG’s Outreach and Public Engagement Working Group (OPEWG) and volunteers comprising research scientists, clinical anatomy teaching staff, and graduate and undergraduate students.

Randy Bruno and Scott Waddell receive Wellcome Discovery Awards

Congratulations are in order for Professors Randy Bruno and Scott Waddell who have each been awarded a prestigious Wellcome Trust Discovery Award to significantly enhance our understanding of higher cognitive functions.