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Oxford spinout EvOx Therapeutics will harness the body's own precision communications system to deliver drugs to specific parts of the body, with the aim of treating conditions which are currently untreatable – including those affecting the brain, as well as autoimmune diseases and cancers.

EvOx has raised £10m in seed funding from investment company Oxford Sciences Innovation to move the technology through pre-clinical and early clinical trials.

The Oxford team has been led by DPAG's Professor Matthew Wood and Dr Samir El Andaloussi, Research Fellow at Oxford and Assistant Professor at Sweden's Karolinska Institutet. They found that by using the body's own mini-transporters – tiny circular nanostructures which shuttle materials between cells – they are able to smuggle drug therapies into the brain, targeting new treatments to the correct tissues.

Read more here.

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