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Professor Vladyslav Vyazovskiy, a neuroscientist here in DPAG, has contributed to a new book, which reflects on the experiences of night-shift workers. 

The book, for which Vlad is co-author, brings together collections from other neuroscientists, as well as anthropologists, authors, cab-drivers, and artists, all pondering the conditions of nocturnal labour.

"Through each contribution," reads the book's blurb, "the night shift is interpreted as a displaced, ambivalent space - a disciplined protocol, of calm meditation, of queer autonomy, of hedonistic resistance, or of exhaustion beyond words".

To find out more and for a chance to get your hands on this book, visit its website here.

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