Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Scientists have identified the neural pathway in male fruit flies that allows them to perform their complex mating ritual, paving the way for deeper studies into sexual behavior and how it can be modified by social experience.

Similar stories

New blood test from DPAG cardiac researchers could save lives of heart attack victims

Researchers from the Herring group have developed a blood test that measures stress hormone levels after heart attacks. The test – costing just £10 – could ensure patients receive timely life-saving treatment.

Mootaz Salman set to target new treatments for stroke

The Chief Scientist Office of the Government of Scotland has awarded a collaborative grant of £298,966 to Dr Mootaz Salman to seek new therapeutic avenues to treat stroke.

Gero Miesenböck awarded 2023 Japan Prize

Congratulations are in order for Professor Gero Miesenböck, who has been awarded the 2023 Japan Prize in the field of Life Sciences, together with Professor Karl Deisseroth, for pioneering work in the field of optogenetics.

New BBSRC grant to further our insights into how the cortex controls sleep

Professor of Sleep Physiology Vladyslav Vyazovskiy and Professor of Developmental Neuroscience Zoltán Molnár have been awarded a Project Grant from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) for “Brain mechanisms of sleep: top-down or bottom-up?”

Raised intracellular chloride levels underlie the effects of tiredness in cortex

A new study, co-authored by Professor Vladyslav Vyazovskiy, published in Nature Neuroscience, has revealed that intracellular chloride levels within cortical pyramidal neurons reflect sleep–wake history.