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Auditory Neuroscience

Making Sense of Sound, by Jan Schnupp, Eli Nelken and Andrew King (MIT Press)
Making Sense of Sound, by Jan Schnupp, Eli Nelken and Andrew King (MIT Press)

A public engagement website created by DPAG researchers has been recommended by The Society for Neuroscience as a teaching resource and will feature on the BrainFacts.org website. The site created Jan Schnupp by and Andrew King in collaboration with Eli Nelken from the Hebrew University is designed to complement their highly acclaimed textbook of the same name.

Featuring sound examples, colour figures, animations, links and other materials the site provides one of the most accessible introductions to auditory neuroscience available.

To visit the site click here.

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