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Congratulations are in order for Lukas Krone, who has been presented the 2020 Christian Guilleminault Young Investigator Award by the World Sleep Society.

Informal headshot outside of Lukas Krone

DPhil student Lukas Krone, supervised by Associate Professor Vladyslav Vyazovskiy, Professor Colin Akerman, and Professor Zoltán Molnár, is a shared winner of this year's Christian Guilleminault Young Investigator Award.

The prize was awarded by the World Sleep Society in recognition for Dr Krone's research on Cortical regulation of global sleep homeostasis presented at the ESRS Virtual Congress 2020 held in September. Lukas is sharing this year’s award with Dr Larissa C. Engert, a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard Medical School, whose research focuses on the relationship between sleep disturbances and neuroinflammation.

The young investigator awards are designed to encourage young investigators in the field of sleep to advance sleep medicine and research globally. The award is named after eminent clinician and scientist Dr Christian Guilleminault, who devoted his career to this cause. Dr Guilleminault is renowned for his involvement in the first classification and identification of sleep disorders. His groundbreaking research in the areas of sleep apnea, pediatric sleep disorders and narcolepsy made him a leader in the field of sleep medicine and research, alongside his mentoring of numerous physicians and scientists.

Earlier this year, Lukas received a Young Scientist Abstract Award from the European Sleep Research Society for his DPhil project and shared first prize at DPAG’s Sherrington Talks 2020.

 

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