Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you will not see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Stimulating the heart to repair itself is within scientific touching distance, thanks in large part to the work of Professor Paul Riley and his team in the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics

Article published on the Raconteur website.

 

Almost 500 people suffer a heart attack every day in the UK and seven out of ten survive. But the uplifting statistic masks a deeper problem in that most will join the 550,000-strong ranks of people living with debilitating heart failure.

Heart transplants are rare – only 181 were performed in 2014 – so the Holy Grail in cardiology is the ability to stimulate the heart to repair itself and regrow naturally.

It seems that nature has been kind by ensuring some of the cells that cause the heart to form in the embryo persist in adulthood, although they stay dormant during the ageing process when the heart deteriorates.

But scientists have discovered a method of re-activating some of the cells to create new heart tissue that could have a curative impact on diseased hearts and generate an improved quality of life to those who normally would have been consigned to a slow-paced decline.

 

For the rest of the article, please visit the Raconteur website.

Similar stories

Researchers discover novel form of adaptation in the auditory system

DPAG’s auditory neuroscience researchers have found that the auditory system adapts to the changing acoustics of reverberant environments by temporally shifting the inhibitory tuning of cortical neurons to remove reverberation.

Collaborative team driven by DPAG and Chemistry awarded RSC Horizon Prize

The Molecular Flow Sensor Team, with collaborating members principally from DPAG’s Robbins and Talbot groups and the Department of Chemistry, has been named the winner of the Royal Society of Chemistry’s (RSC) Analytical Division Horizon Prize for the development of a new technology for measuring lung function.

REF 2021 results

DPAG researchers showcased at premier European Society of Cardiology meeting

DPAG scientists across four research groups were highlighted at the major annual European Society of Cardiology basic science conference (FCVB 2022). Congratulations are in order for Dr KC Park on receiving the Young Investigator Award and to Dr Elisabetta Gamen on winning the Moderated Poster Prize.

Oxford Parkinson’s Disease Centre awarded £3.8 million to reveal the role of calcium in Parkinson’s

A collaborative research team led by the Oxford Parkinson’s Disease Centre (OPDC) has been awarded a £3.8 million Wellcome Trust Collaborative Award to study the function of calcium in dopamine neurons, and how this is plays a role in Parkinson’s. Their research will help explain how and why dopamine neurons are vulnerable in the disease and look at how they may be preserved.