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Supported by the BBSRC, Dr Sachse will encourage Oxfordshire state school pupils to discover the otherwise invisible in a unique interactive experience.

Insulin and abnormally stored glycogen in a diabetic islet

As part of British Science Week, the Ashcroft group's Gregor Sachse is holding a microscopy workshop for around 90 Year 2 school children at the Europa School UK in Culham. 

The workshop will give young children the opportunity to discover a fascinating field of science in a tailored, hands-on experience, where they will be given a wide range of materials to view under the microscope.

 

Hands-on microscopy is a powerful experience that excites and engages the curiosity and inquisitiveness of students. It introduces technology and science as a means to discover the otherwise invisible and fosters confidence in children that they can be discoverers and scientists too. Year 2 is an excellent age group to maximise this impact.
- Dr Sachse

Gregor will begin his workshop with a short presentation, followed by engaging the children with hands-on microscopy in groups of 8 for half an hour each, with two children per microscope. Children will be encouraged and given help to identify, draw and label what they see. He is offering both fixed and live specimen for exploration. Materials will include amoeba and cotton plant stem, to name a few. Gregor will also seek feedback from the children and their teachers to assess the impact of his activity.

Starting today, his workshop will run until Thursday 14 March.

This fantastic piece of outreach work is supported by the BBSRC through Gregor's research grant.

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REF 2021 results