Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you will not see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Emma Bardsley won two prizes: BHF CRE Annual Symposium 2016: 19/9/2016 - Runner Up Poster Prize and OXION Annual Symposium 2016: 30/9/2016 - Winner of the Journal of General Physiology Poster Prize

Emma Bardsley

Congratulations to Emma Bardsley, a postgraduate student in the Paterson lab on these two recent prizes.

The awards were presented to Emma for her research investigating whether beta adrenergic blockers, the current gold standard treatment for cardiovascular disease, may also act via the peripheral nervous system.

Emma's data suggests that beta 1 and beta 2 adrenoceptors are present in both human and rat sympathetic stellate ganglia. Moreover, isoprenaline-dependent stimulation of cAMP-PKA signalling and mobilisation of intracellular calcium is enhanced in neurons obtained from the pro-hypertensive SHR rat. 

Similar stories

Small Lecture Theatre renamed to honour DPAG pioneer Florence Buchanan

The newly renamed Florence Buchanan Lecture Theatre is testament to Dr Buchanan’s pioneering career in physiology, in line with the Department's ongoing commitment to acknowledge the significant contribution of women to DPAG and its predecessor departments.

Continued ethical animal research needed to advance treatment of brain disease, researchers argue

More research is needed to improve the treatment of brain diseases such as depression, Alzheimer’s or ADHD. A widely held view within the scientific community is that this cannot be done without ethically conducted animal research. A team of seventy international neuroscientists, including DPAG’s Associate Professor Vladyslav Vyazovskiy, have now published a warning that animal research is under pressure, which endangers the further development of treatments.

Cortex may regulate the need for sleep

Why we sleep, and the processes behind sleep, are amongst the most interesting questions in modern neuroscience. Researchers at the University of Oxford, including DPAG's Molnár and Vyazovskiy group scientists, have now uncovered a new target for sleep investigations within the mammalian brain – the cerebral cortex. The paper, first authored by Dr Lukas Krone, was published today in Nature Neuroscience.

Reducing fat in the diabetic heart could improve recovery from heart attack

New research from the Heather Group has shown that in type 2 diabetes an overload of lipids reduces the heart’s ability to generate energy during a heart attack, decreasing chances of recovery.

The brain’s one-sided teaching signals

A new study by the Lak group reveals a novel facet of dopamine signalling during visual decision making.