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The medical science doctoral training centre (MSDTC) DPhil day is an annual symposium for their students. Emma was placed third for her poster from all the DPhil students who presented their research.

Emma Bardsley

 

Emma is in her second year of a 4 year Wellcome Trust OXION DPhil. The work she presented was carried out in Professor David Paterson’s lab with a collaboration with Dr. Konstantinos Lefkimmiatis, who provided the FRET sensors for use in this study.

The Paterson group primarily focuses on investigating the role of the autonomic nervous system in hypertension, and in particular the key molecular players that drive sympathetic stellate hyperactivity. In this poster, Emma demonstrated impaired cyclic nucleotide signalling in sympathetic neurons prior to the development of hypertension.

Congratulations Emma!

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