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From 21st to 23rd March 2016, the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics will host a white fibre dissection course covering the cortical and subcortical white fibre anatomy, which is the first of its kind in the country.

This comprehensive course will be delivered with 3D lectures and hands-on cadaver dissections, in fact each course participant will work on a cadaver brain. The course will cover clinical applications of DTI during awake surgery for intrinsic gliomas.

Gliomas are intrinsic tumours in the brain and approximately 4000-5000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the UK. Low grade gliomas affect young patients and usually around eloquent areas (speech, movement and cognition etc). Therefore understanding how the tumour relates to important nerve fibres in the brain helps resect the tumour without causing a neurological deficit. This course teaches hand on anatomy of the Fibre tracts. 

The course will also address surgery for deep brain stimulation, a surgical procedure used to treat a variety of disabling neurological symptoms, most commonly the debilitating symptoms of Parkinson's disease such as tremor, rigidity, stiffness, slowed movement, and walking problems.

The course director is Mr Puneet Plaha MS MD FRCS(SN), Consultant Neuro oncology surgeon, Oxford University Hospitals whose interests are focused on using minimally invasive endoscopic techniques to resect brain tumours and advanced brain imaging technologies to develop individually-tailored treatment for brain tumours. He has developed the awake surgery programme in Oxford and uses intraoperative stimulation to understand brain function and “supramaximally” resect brain tumours.

The workshop, which runs from 21st to 23rd March 2016, is limited to 10 participants.

To apply to attend please email: Puneet.Plaha@ouh.nhs.uk

Workshop and course fee: Each participant £1,200

This includes lectures, materials, cadaver workshop, DTI workstations and meals including course dinner.

For further information please download the course flier here.

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