Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you will not see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

From 21st to 23rd March 2016, the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics will host a white fibre dissection course covering the cortical and subcortical white fibre anatomy, which is the first of its kind in the country.

This comprehensive course will be delivered with 3D lectures and hands-on cadaver dissections, in fact each course participant will work on a cadaver brain. The course will cover clinical applications of DTI during awake surgery for intrinsic gliomas.

Gliomas are intrinsic tumours in the brain and approximately 4000-5000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the UK. Low grade gliomas affect young patients and usually around eloquent areas (speech, movement and cognition etc). Therefore understanding how the tumour relates to important nerve fibres in the brain helps resect the tumour without causing a neurological deficit. This course teaches hand on anatomy of the Fibre tracts. 

The course will also address surgery for deep brain stimulation, a surgical procedure used to treat a variety of disabling neurological symptoms, most commonly the debilitating symptoms of Parkinson's disease such as tremor, rigidity, stiffness, slowed movement, and walking problems.

The course director is Mr Puneet Plaha MS MD FRCS(SN), Consultant Neuro oncology surgeon, Oxford University Hospitals whose interests are focused on using minimally invasive endoscopic techniques to resect brain tumours and advanced brain imaging technologies to develop individually-tailored treatment for brain tumours. He has developed the awake surgery programme in Oxford and uses intraoperative stimulation to understand brain function and “supramaximally” resect brain tumours.

The workshop, which runs from 21st to 23rd March 2016, is limited to 10 participants.

To apply to attend please email: Puneet.Plaha@ouh.nhs.uk

Workshop and course fee: Each participant £1,200

This includes lectures, materials, cadaver workshop, DTI workstations and meals including course dinner.

For further information please download the course flier here.

Similar stories

Drug trial that could improve respiratory recovery from COVID-19 now underway

Research

A clinical trial has commenced this week to test whether a drug called almitrine can help people who are seriously ill with COVID-19 to recover from the disease.

Same genome, different worlds: How a similar brain causes sexually dimorphic behaviours

CNCB Goodwin Group News Publication Research

A new paper from the Goodwin group based in DPAG's Centre for Neural Circuits and Behaviour has shown how males and females are programmed differently in terms of sex.

New form of gift wrap drives male reproductive success

Publication Research Wilson Group News

The transfer of complex mixtures of signals and nutrients between individuals is a key step in several biologically important events in our lives, such as breastfeeding and sexual intercourse. However, we know relatively little about the ways in which the molecular gifts involved are packaged to ensure their successful delivery to the recipient.

Just over half of British Indians would take COVID vaccine

EDI News Outreach Postdoctoral Publication Research Riley Group News

University of Oxford researchers from the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics (DPAG) and the Department of Psychiatry, in collaboration with The 1928 Institute, have published a major new study on the impact of COVID-19 on the UK’s largest BME population.

Earliest origins of the forming heart identified

Cardiac Theme Postdoctoral Publication Research

The earliest known progenitor of the outermost layer of the heart has been characterised for the first time and linked to the development of other critical cell types in the developing heart in a new paper from the Srinivas group led by BHF Immediate Fellow Dr Richard Tyser.