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Robert Wilkins, Associate Professor of Epithelial Physiology and Neil Herring, Associate Prefessor of Cardiovascular Physiology have joined forces to publish a textbook via OUP on "Basic Sciences for Core Medical Training".

The textbook is aimed at clinicians studying for the MRCP but its emphasis on how basic science specifically relates to the medical specialities makes it just as relevant for medical students too. It is available to purchase from the OUP.

 Providing a clear explanation of the relevant medical science behind the individual medical specialties, Basic Science for Core Medical Training and the MRCP, is an indispensable part of a candidate's MRCP preparation. Directly linked to the Royal College exam, the book follows the same systems-based approach as the syllabus for accurate and effective revision.

With full coverage of basic science for the medical specialities, the book features material on genetics, cellular, molecular and membrane biology, and biochemistry. Content is presented in an illustrated and easy-to-read format, ensuring that the basic science for each medical specialty is more approachable and accessible. A focus on how the basic sciences aid understanding of clinical practice is reinforced through key tables of differential diagnoses and pharmacology.

Ten multiple choice questions at the end of each chapter consolidate learning and enable candidates to test their knowledge. The book also covers common examination errors and areas of misunderstanding to aid learning and help candidates avoid common pitfalls.

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