Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you will not see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

A new Cancer Research grant will help them develop early detection methods for one of the leading causes of cancer death in the UK.

Image courtesy of P. Lao-Sirieix

Deborah Goberdhan and Elizabeth Bird-Lieberman from the Translational Gastroenterology Unit of the Experimental Medicine Division, John Radcliffe Hospital, have been awarded a Cancer Research UK Primer grant of £100,000 to study ‘Serum extracellular vesicle signatures as biomarkers for non-invasive early detection of oesophageal adencarcinoma’.  

Exosomes are a type of extracellular vesicle, carrying complex mixtures of proteins and other macromolecules, which are key mediators of communication between cancer cells.  

The award builds on the team’s recent identification of novel exosome subtypes and clinical expertise in oesophageal cancer to develop non-invasive early detection methods for this disease, the fifth most common cause of cancer death in the UK.

This grant provides funds to support a Postdoctoral Research Scientist and a part-time Research Technician.  A/Prof Goberdhan and Dr Bird-Lieberman would be happy to receive informal enquiries about these positions by email. 

Similar stories

Blood bank storage can reduce ability of transfusions to treat anaemia

New research from the Swietach Group in collaboration with NHS Blood and Transplant has demonstrated that the process of storing blood in blood banks can negatively impact the function of red blood cells and consequently may reduce the effectiveness of blood transfusions, a treatment commonly used to combat anaemia.

Overlapping second messengers increase dynamic control of physiological responses

New research from the Parekh and Zaccolo groups reveals that a prototypical anchoring protein, known to be responsible for regulating several important physiological processes, also orchestrates the formation of two important universal second messengers.

Xin Sun shortlisted in national science image competition

DPAG Postdoctoral Research Scientist Dr Xin Sun has been shortlisted in the British Heart Foundation’s (BHF) annual ‘Reflections of Research’ image competition.

Feeling tired? Here’s how the brain’s ‘hourglass’ controls your need for sleep – new research

New article on The Conversation website written by Dr Lukas Krone, Associate Professor Vladyslav Vyazovskiy and Professor Zoltán Molnár.

Scientists Decipher How NeuroImmune Interactions Burn Deep Fat

A pioneering collaborative mouse study from an international team of researchers including DPAG's Associate Professor Ana Domingos published in Nature offers new therapeutic avenues for reducing visceral fat stores, which have been associated with cardiovascular disease and multiple types of cancer.