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A refurbished British Heart Foundation charity shop opened yesterday, with the help of one of our Professors, whose work is funded by the charity

Professor Paul Riley was joined by staff, volunteers and the public at the launch of the expanded St Ebbe’s Street store.

Money raised from the Oxford shop will help researchers, such as Professor Riley, find a way of healing damaged hearts.
His work aims to find new treatments for people who have suffered a heart attack, or are living with heart failure.

He described opening the shop as a ‘real pleasure’, adding: “It was great to meet all the staff and volunteers of the Oxford team, as well as members of the public who help to raise funds for important research like mine.”

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*Published in the Oxford Mail.

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