Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you will not see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

BBSRC is investing £10m in 20 advanced scientific research instruments.

BBSRC is investing £10m in 20 advanced scientific research instruments under the Advanced Life Sciences Research Technology initiative (ALERT 13) to help keep the UK at the forefront of biological sciences research. Shankar Srinivas and Paul Riley from the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, together with Ilan Davis (Biochemistry and Micron Oxford Advanced Bioimaging Unit), Jordan Raff (Sir William Dunn School of Pathology) and Roger Patient (Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine) have been awarded one of the UK’s first two commercial Fluorescence Light Sheet Microscopes to probe cell and tissue dynamics, worth just under £500k. This instrument will allow groups from Oxford and further afield to examine dynamic process within living cells in exquisite detail, enabling exciting advances in a broad range of areas in cell, developmental and stem cell biology.

The ALERT 13 scheme preferentially funds applications where the equipment will get maximum use, and sharing between research groups is encouraged. The instrument will be housed within and managed by the Micron Oxford Advanced Bioimaging Unit and will therefore be widely accessible to researchers. Several groups across the University of Oxford as well as groups from Harwell and Bristol have already expressed an interest in using this new facility. Collaboration and extending access to the instruments to industry and public sector users is also envisaged to enhance the potential impact of research.

Similar stories

Just over half of British Indians would take COVID vaccine

EDI News Outreach Postdoctoral Publication Research Riley Group News

University of Oxford researchers from the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics (DPAG) and the Department of Psychiatry, in collaboration with The 1928 Institute, have published a major new study on the impact of COVID-19 on the UK’s largest BME population.

Thomas Willis (1621 - 1675) 400th Birthday - Alastair Buchan in conversation with Zoltán Molnár

General Research

Professor Zoltán Molnár talks to Pro-Vice-Chancellor Professor Alastair Buchan to learn more about Thomas Willis's residence and base for scientific discoveries, Beam Hall.

Thomas Willis (1621 - 1675) 400th Birthday - Erica Charters in conversation with Zoltán Molnár

General Research

Professor Zoltán Molnár talks to Dr Erica Charters for a History of Medicine perspective on Oxford physician and Father of Neurology Thomas Willis.

Thomas Willis 400th anniversary trailer

General Research

On 27 January 2021 we celebrate the 400th anniversary of the birth of the greatest neuroanatomist of all time, Thomas Willis. DPAG's Professor Zoltán Molnár has interviewed 8 experts - watch a video preview of what's to come from Monday onwards! With thanks to St John's College.

Earliest origins of the forming heart identified

Cardiac Theme Postdoctoral Publication Research

The earliest known progenitor of the outermost layer of the heart has been characterised for the first time and linked to the development of other critical cell types in the developing heart in a new paper from the Srinivas group led by BHF Immediate Fellow Dr Richard Tyser.

Covid-19 lung damage identified in study

Postdoctoral Research

In a new study into the longer-term damage amongst patients recovering from COVID-19, DPAG Research Fellow Dr James Grist of the Tyler Lab has been running a novel scanning technique that shows a dramatic decrease in the ability of the lungs to diffuse gas in to the blood stream after COVID infection. This work may shed light on the problem of breathlessness after COVID infection and help guide us in understanding therapeutic selection and efficacy.