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BBSRC is investing £10m in 20 advanced scientific research instruments.

BBSRC is investing £10m in 20 advanced scientific research instruments under the Advanced Life Sciences Research Technology initiative (ALERT 13) to help keep the UK at the forefront of biological sciences research. Shankar Srinivas and Paul Riley from the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, together with Ilan Davis (Biochemistry and Micron Oxford Advanced Bioimaging Unit), Jordan Raff (Sir William Dunn School of Pathology) and Roger Patient (Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine) have been awarded one of the UK’s first two commercial Fluorescence Light Sheet Microscopes to probe cell and tissue dynamics, worth just under £500k. This instrument will allow groups from Oxford and further afield to examine dynamic process within living cells in exquisite detail, enabling exciting advances in a broad range of areas in cell, developmental and stem cell biology.

The ALERT 13 scheme preferentially funds applications where the equipment will get maximum use, and sharing between research groups is encouraged. The instrument will be housed within and managed by the Micron Oxford Advanced Bioimaging Unit and will therefore be widely accessible to researchers. Several groups across the University of Oxford as well as groups from Harwell and Bristol have already expressed an interest in using this new facility. Collaboration and extending access to the instruments to industry and public sector users is also envisaged to enhance the potential impact of research.

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