Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you will not see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

BBSRC is investing £10m in 20 advanced scientific research instruments.

BBSRC is investing £10m in 20 advanced scientific research instruments under the Advanced Life Sciences Research Technology initiative (ALERT 13) to help keep the UK at the forefront of biological sciences research. Shankar Srinivas and Paul Riley from the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, together with Ilan Davis (Biochemistry and Micron Oxford Advanced Bioimaging Unit), Jordan Raff (Sir William Dunn School of Pathology) and Roger Patient (Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine) have been awarded one of the UK’s first two commercial Fluorescence Light Sheet Microscopes to probe cell and tissue dynamics, worth just under £500k. This instrument will allow groups from Oxford and further afield to examine dynamic process within living cells in exquisite detail, enabling exciting advances in a broad range of areas in cell, developmental and stem cell biology.

The ALERT 13 scheme preferentially funds applications where the equipment will get maximum use, and sharing between research groups is encouraged. The instrument will be housed within and managed by the Micron Oxford Advanced Bioimaging Unit and will therefore be widely accessible to researchers. Several groups across the University of Oxford as well as groups from Harwell and Bristol have already expressed an interest in using this new facility. Collaboration and extending access to the instruments to industry and public sector users is also envisaged to enhance the potential impact of research.

Similar stories

Winners of the DPAG Student Poster Day 2021 announced

"A Year of Progress" was held in the Sherrington Library and Sherrington PCR Café on Thursday 18 November 2021.

Oxford-led research maps milestone stage of human development for the first time

Scientists have shed light on an important stage of early embryonic development that has never been fully mapped out in humans before.

Mapping uncharted networks in the progression of Parkinson’s

A major new $9 million project funded by the Aligning Science Across Parkinson’s (ASAP) initiative will map the original circuits vulnerable to Parkinson’s on an unprecedented scale. The project is a collaboration between core investigators Stephanie Cragg, Richard Wade-Martins, and Peter Magill at Oxford, Mark Howe at Boston University and Dinos Meletis at the Karolinska Institutet, as well as collaborators Yulong Li at Peking University and Michael Lin at Stanford University.

Drug could help diabetic hearts recover after a heart attack

New research led by Associate Professor Lisa Heather has found that a drug known as molidustat, currently in clinical trials for another condition, could reduce risk of heart failure after heart attacks.

Blood bank storage can reduce ability of transfusions to treat anaemia

New research from the Swietach Group in collaboration with NHS Blood and Transplant has demonstrated that the process of storing blood in blood banks can negatively impact the function of red blood cells and consequently may reduce the effectiveness of blood transfusions, a treatment commonly used to combat anaemia.