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People think they are in control of their own decisions: what to eat or drink, whom to marry or pick a fight with, where to live, what to buy. Behavioural economists and neurophysiologists have long studied decision-making behaviours. However, these behaviours have only recently been studied through the light of molecular genetics. Here, we review recent research in mice, Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans, that analyses the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying decision-making. These studies interrogate decision-making about food, sexual behaviour, aggression or foraging strategies, and add molecular and cell biology understanding onto the consilience of brain and decision.

Original publication

DOI

10.15252/embr.201438993

Type

Journal article

Journal

EMBO Rep

Publication Date

10/2014

Volume

15

Pages

1023 - 1035

Keywords

aggression, decision‐making, nutrient sensing, obesity, sexual behaviour, Animals, Brain, Caenorhabditis elegans, Decision Making, Drosophila melanogaster, Feeding Behavior, Humans, Mice, Sexual Behavior, Animal