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What is the key to success for women who work in science? A new website, launched this week, delves into the experiences of successful women in science at the University of Oxford, through a collection of video narratives.

Funded by the Vice Chancellor’s Diversity Fund at Oxford University, the interviews with 39 successful women tell an inspiring story of an ongoing culture shift for women working in science, where according to those interviewed, discrimination is rarely experienced and the work is fun, interesting and exciting.


The researchers used a thematic analysis to identify and write about the variety of issues important to the women who were interviewed, which included obtaining funding, career progression, mentorship, and taking parental leave.


Find out more: www.womeninscience.ox.ac.uk – An inspirational journey of women’s experiences in science

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