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Five Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s researchers from Richard Wade-Martins, lab (The WadeRunners), took part in the Vertical Rush challenge in aid of Shelter on March 15th, 2018.
Rebecca Wallings, Deepak Kumar, Charmaine Lang, Peter Kilfeather and Bryan Ng climbed the 42 floors (932 steps), and joined 1000 runners taking on the challenge to raise funds for Shelter. 
150 families are made homeless in Britain every day. Shelter’s services are doing all they can to ensure everyone has a place to call home.
The WadeRunners finished 16th out of 56 teams taking part. Pete finished in 5:40, the 6th fastest time of the day. Charmaine (8:21) and Becky (8:23) were in the top 10 ladies in their wave.
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