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An Oxford University medical student who stepped in to help a stranger off a train has been identified following a viral appeal to find and thank her. Rebecca te Water Naude was once a member of Stephanie Cragg's Group here in DPAG.

David Murray, who has Parkinson's Disease, had been travelling by train from London to Cardiff when his medication failed, leaving him barely able to move.

Fourth year Oxford medical student, Rebecca te Water Naude, saw Mr Murray struggling at Cardiff Central Station on 28th March and helped him off the train before calling station staff to ensure he received help.

After the event he took to Twitter to find the student who helped, with his message being re-tweeted more than 28,000 times.

Rebecca is a former DPAG student who was part of Stephanie Cragg's laboratory: her research dissertation investigated the regulation of calcium channels which are implicated in Parkinson's. 

The full story is available on the University of Oxford website.

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